T O P
ZaneStrizz

I just don’t feel like this saw was built for trees that large. A smaller gas would have trouble.


Armed_Muppet

Agreed this is an extremely tough job for that small saw, I believe this saw is comparable to a 40cc gas chainsaw. These are meant for thick branches, not trunks.


Neoliberal_Boogeyman

you should have seen OP's attempt at felling it in the most hapazard and dangerous way possible. this isnt the first time he's been told to get a proper saw for this job. edit: ohhh my god OP [never sharpened his chain](https://old.reddit.com/r/MilwaukeeTool/comments/xkiv62/the_magic_is_starting_to_tarnish_the_m18_16/ipeyzif/) and now wonders why it isnt cutting as well.


MrHaphazard1

I think there's alot wrong with this post.


WarWinx

That’s probably fair.


Ambitious-Appeal6883

If the saw is no longer producing chips while cutting and is just producing more or less just saw dust then the chain definitely needs sharpening. The Stihl 2 in one works great. The files wear out after so many uses and can be rotated in the tool to bring around a good spot in the file but the raker file doesn’t have that ability since it is a rectangle. I just take the raker file out and use a separate guide and flat file to bring down the height of he raker. There is multiple sizes of sharpeners for different chains like 1/4 Pico, 3/8 Pico, 3/8, 0.325 and upward so make sure to know the size of your chain to be able to get the right sharpener.


WarWinx

Okay, but if it’s producing nothing but clean chips, then it’s probably still fairly sharp, right?


[deleted]

It should look like soap flakes. You’re using an underpowered saw with a much too small bar. Sharpening regularly is only going to make things easier. I know this tree was standing recently, so it’s probably clean. But when I’m cutting firewood from leftover logging in the bush or at the sawmill I work at I usually sharpen my chain every tank.


Ambitious-Appeal6883

Yeah a chain that is still sorta sharp just takes a couple strokes of the file to bring the sharpness. A dull chain takes much more to bring back. No harm in just giving it a go. Pay attention to the feel of the file stroke and soon you will understand what a sharp tooth is. No need to rush when sharpening either that’s a good way to end up with a chain that don’t cut like new or barely cuts at all. Take your time watch the process and make sure you are comfortable and balanced when sharpening. A small saw like this won’t take long to freshen up the chain.


Legitimate_Street_85

I'm surprised an 18v saw did that


Armed_Muppet

Seriously, I’d be proud not upset haha.


WarWinx

Well, I guess that makes me feel a little better.


Armed_Muppet

How long did it take?


WarWinx

I’ve been doing a few cuts a day before I’m out of battery; I think I’m on day three or four (not consecutive).


The_BusFromSpeed

Sharpen your chain, you damn fool. Even small gassers would struggle with this. Your expectations are hilariously unreasonable, and to make matters worse you don't even maintain the thing.


Thebandroid

Not gonna lie, I’m surprised anyone thought an electric chainsaw would be suitable for this task. The arborists here in Australia only use them for pruning small limbs before they get chipperd. Even the climbers up top still use a small petrol one.


WarWinx

I mean, I’m completely inexperienced with using chainsaws on actual trees, so I’m willing to acknowledge ignorance.


Armed_Muppet

Your saw did a really decent job for the task at hand. I would recommend 12Ah batteries if you have any.


WarWinx

12, 8, and two 6s; The twelve obviously lasts the longest, but the sixes cool down from overheating the fastest.


sparkey504

i CAN NOT RECOMMEND The stihl 2in1 sharpener enough... it takes many of the errors out of sharpening a chain and thats coming from someone who knows how to use a file or a stone correctly and accurately and the 2in1 hands down puts the best edge on a chain besides oem and a sharp chain will definitely increase battery life.


hfxadv

This guy 2 in 1’s


sparkey504

i mean its no 3in1... but definitely better than 1in1


WarWinx

That’s actually a good point: I think the chain is still pretty sharp because of how new it is, but I suppose it isn’t going to hurt anything (other than me if I make a mistake) being too sharp, is it?


sparkey504

"too sharp" is not possible... the edge angle can be to small which would cause the edge to wear faster and or brake but if you use the 2in1 tool im talking about and use it half ass correctly its not possible. i have 3 of these sharpners due to running 3 different chain sizes, and they do have knock offs that look identical but i got mine at a local hardware store so i cant speak of the knock off quality but this $30 (at the time when i bought them) sharpner is mandatory in my opinion for a chainsaw. search 2in1 sharpner anywhere and youll find places to buy them. https://www.stihlusa.com/products/chain-saws/filing-tools/2in1file/


MacintoshDan1

The blue ones are not knockoffs. Pferd is the company that makes them for Sthil. They are awesome I use one with my m12 hatchet and Ryobi 40v saw. Around $30 on Amazon.


pew_medic338

Saw guys and pros will often sharpen new chains out of the box. There's factory sharp, and then there's hand sharpened sharp. Guilty of Treeson on YouTube has good sharpening vids, as do many others.


Mr_MacGrubber

If you never sharpened it after making all these cut, it isn’t sharp anymore. I would’ve sharpened my chain a couple of times for that much cutting.


hfxadv

Agreed like I probably would have used the Stihl 2 in sharpener after 6-8 buck cuts. The Stihl sharpener is one of my most used tool period, game changer really.


TinaKedamina

I just ordered one. I recently moved to the Pacific North West from the South and these trees are no joke. I have been trying to learn how to sharpen a chainsaw chain with little success. Thanks y’all!


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Mr_MacGrubber

Yeah that’s a large part of why the saw struggled


T10mvp

Sooo any experience with the knock of 2 in 1 tools on Amazon for half the price of the still? They look identical.


ConnectCow9111

Only use 8 or 12 with such a high draw tool. The 6 uses it's amps up quicker on high power tools and since the capacity is lower it will die much quicker. I've learned that 2- 6.0 batteries are NOT equal to a 12 for tools like that. If it was an impact wrench or something like that yeah the 6 would work just fine.


BallinStalin2266

yes, the 6 will die quicker but will have less voltage sag under load compared to the 8


ConnectCow9111

Not in my experience. I put a 6 in a chop saw and the saw was definitely underperforming until I put the 8 or 12.


BallinStalin2266

interesting, maybe the saw detects the 8.0 and bumps up the draw 6.0 and 8.0 are both a 2p battery with 21700 cells. so 3 and 4 ah cells respectively. it is universally true that for the same size cell, the lower capacity version will be rated for higher amp draw. not saying your experience is invalid, as there are factors of programming which can make a difference ever wonder why they dont make a 4.0 HO pack same size as the 3? the 1p configuration of that pack would have a voltage sag that would make you question the high output rating. so they never made it


ConnectCow9111

No I definitely agree, however I also theorized same as you that Milwaukee has some type of programming in the tool to reduce the draw for the lower capacity batteries for high power tools. I don't think it applies to all of their tools but with the chop saw I couldn't even make it through ⅒ of the cut for a 3" piece of ductile iron pipe before I gave up and switched to the 12 and immediately I noticed a difference in power. It probably depends on the tool because I don't notice this issue when I use smaller batteries on the 6" grinder even though that thing drains batteries pretty quick too. I don't know much about battery cell configurations but I do know that the 6.0 and 3.0 give the most power because of the types of batteries in them while the 8 and 12 give you the longer lasting power, so high power tools Milwaukee usually recommends you use the batteries designated High Demand(8/12) rather than High Output(3/6). I use this same principle with my flashlight, when I want my light to be as bright as possible I use the Samsung 21700, but when I want It to last a long time I switch to the 26650.


BallinStalin2266

good information. but could you clarify, earlier you said how the 8 outperforms the 6, but in your latest response you say the 6 gives more power, but the 8 lasts longer is your definition of outperforming only related to runtime and not power? and which samsung 21700, molicell just came out with a 21700 4500mah 45a continuous (80celcius) battery which tests at a higher capacity than than the samsung 50t when tested at over 10-15 amps


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ClipIn

Removed. See Rule 1. What a pointless pissing match.


disaster436

Soon as I saw that post I was super impressed. Because I knew a full size gas powered chainsaw that has some years on it would struggle to cut through that tree for sure. This just shows how good Milwaukee products are. I was using a stihl mini gas chainsaw the other day to cut a tree half that size and it was a struggle and took forever to cut through. Right after a chainsaw maintenance was done. And that Milwaukee is smaller than the Stihl mini and battery powered. Craazy!


inko75

milwaukees saw has a super thin kerf, which can help cutting in faster but is a disaster when pinched


[deleted]

Ignorance and inexperience can get you killed with what you’re trying to do with the wrong tool and zero experience.


WarWinx

I don’t want to sound defensive, but I am very aware of the danger and do my (inexperienced) best to follow the basic safety guidelines I have come across (like the ones included in the saw’s manual and several safety videos). I intentionally take my time, and try not to get too bull-headed on cuts that I start ignoring basic safety.


[deleted]

But you didn’t google how to correctly fell a huge tree and what type of chainsaw that might be required?


WarWinx

I did: I made some really early mistakes (despite “knowing” better) in starting to fell it, and had to back off and take more time to overcome those mistakes. The one that stuck out to me on saw size was to never cut something more than twice your bar length. So it wasn’t as easy, but still technically within capacity. But I definitely lived and learned on this one. And appreciate all the concern for my safety I’ve gotten from redditors — save for that which was delivered as a dismissive insult, instead of a helpful critique.


[deleted]

If you are doing these things unsafely, with ignorance as you said yourself, sometimes being upfront and blunt is the way to get through to people. I don’t sugar coat life threatening safety issues. Sorry.


WarWinx

Oh, you were nowhere near insulting! I wasn’t referring to you in the slightest, ha! No, I appreciate that you were looking out for an internet stranger’s safety.


[deleted]

Oh ok, I thought that was a backhanded comment about my comments. You don’t know until you know. And I get that. Maybe I’m too cautious, but I was kinda terrified of my saw when I first got it and didn’t fall a tree until my second summer of cutting firewood. You’re still alive so doing something right bud!


WarWinx

Ha ha, No — you’re all good! You definitely fell on the ‘helpful critique’ side.


The_BusFromSpeed

Noooooooooooooooo shit.


inko75

a small gas powered one will be lighter too


Dekuthegreat

Bro I love Milwaukee as much as the next guy but if you are cutting trees like this often just get yourself a gas powered Stihl or something.


WarWinx

You’re probably right. This was my first foray into cutting my own wood, but roughly the second- or third-biggest trunk on the new land. Really the only reason I started cutting it was the number of rotted logs the previous owners left all over the property - I knew I didn’t want it going to waste.


AsleepHouse9752

If you have multiple trees that will need cut down over the years I would go ahead and invest in a good stihl or Husqvarna with a 20 inch bar. With my MS361 you would have been done by lunch cutting that up.


WarWinx

[Un]fortunately, this is the only one to cut down for the foreseeable.


AsleepHouse9752

If you do end up going with gas ever just drain the gas out and start it back up to drain the carb out. My stihl is 13 years old now and starts within 2 pulls everytime. It's only used on a few trees a year now, but paid for its self the first time I used it.


TNTinRoundRock

Laughs in Stihl


Wanggretzky69247

Farm boss would kick this trees ass


TNTinRoundRock

That’s one that I have. It’s a beast.


AsleepHouse9752

I bought a stihl MS361 with 20 inch bar in 2009 at 15 years old, one of the best purchases I made as a teenager. Only issue I've ever had was a few carb seals go bad from ethanol when under warranty. I've tried a few of the battery powered 16inch saws and wasn't impressed at all. I'll grab my m18 hacksaw with pruning blade for anything under 4 inches. The battery chainsaws definitely cut faster then hacksaw but not worth the cost for me when it can't replace gas. I plan on buying a top handle stihl this winter, battery technology just isn't there yet.


sparkey504

if you already have power tools its kinda a toss up to me... i only have the m12 hatchet and it kicks ASS but i just saw they are coming out with an m18 8" prune saw like the hatchet and a m18 16" top handle.... its hard to justify the $400 for the current m18 16" with battery though when i already have a ms250 and ms460 36"... but my m12 hatchet has been worth every penny!


Killed_By_Covid

I love my M12 Hatchet but wish it were the M18. I'll probably buy that one, too. I may try to sell my M18 chainsaw to help defray the cost. Had the M18 Hatchet been released first, I never would've bought the M12 or M18 full-size.


sparkey504

i only have the m12 but they F-ing KNOW that shit... that and dint wanna hurt the sales of the full size 16".... i have 12v tools for shed use and besides my die grinder its my only 12v as 18v is my jam


Killed_By_Covid

I have a number of M12 mechanic tools, and I really like my M12 multi-tool and Hacksaw. I wonder if the M18 Hatchet/Axe was already in development when the M12 was released or if it was spawned by all the feedback from the M12. I don't think Milwaukee delays release of anything to encourage sales of other products. There are so many of us thirsty tool junkies who only see Red that order of release probably doesn't make more than a blip on their overall sales.


Skintag12

This chainsaw is by no means made for trees that large, but now you know. Typically battery chainsaws are most effective if you cut material that is maximum 2” less than your bar length. So if your cutting with a 16” bar the thickest material you should really be cutting is a 14”


Mr_MacGrubber

I cut some stuff this big after hurricane Ida and it did just fine. I think the lack of chain sharpening is part of the problem.


Meatball315

Jesus man, that’s not what this was made for! You can’t say that it was magic then it sucked! It’s like saying you are so happy with your smart car but it just isn’t as nice pulling the 16’ enclosed trailer!


Snoo_5857

Is your chain sharp? It makes a huge difference.


WarWinx

Judging by the clean chunks it kicks out during a cut, I’m assuming it is.


Snoo_5857

Ok so, going on the assumption that your chain is sharp. (Should be throwing square chips, not dust.) I see your running an aftermarket bar, is it larger? That would take away from the performance of the saw. Type of wood would also effect the performance.


WarWinx

It is an Oregon upgrade from the stock bar/chain - roughly .07” wider. It definitely cuts faster and easier, but agree that it would affect the power draw. ETA: I’m guessing by roughly 15% (.50”/.43” or .43”/.50”)


hfxadv

100% you have to upgrade the bar, makes a big difference


chaunceton

That's really impressive work. Not sure how well my gas-powered craftsman would handle against that amount of cutting.


ooppoo0

That’s why they are making the ax. Unlimited power!


M635_Guy

You were expecting a heck of a lot of magic brother...


WarWinx

“*Only Heavy Duty*”


pew_medic338

It's heavy duty, assuming it's used for the task it's intended for. Right tool for the right job and all. I wouldn't expect my M18 stubby impact to handle semi truck lug nuts, even though it's a beast of a stubby, because it's the wrong tool for the job. As others on here have, you now know the right tool for this job, should you have to do it again, and what this M18 saw is ideal for.


CalmCartographer4

That saw looks tiny sitting on the log. I'm amazed it did that. The bar barely makes it 1/2 way.


WarWinx

It’s at a deceptive angle — the bar does go well over half way on all the rounds it’s on. The very last cut I have to do, at the base of the trunk, may be the closest I’d get.


Sir_Morch

Theirs nothing wrong with being ignorant. It's being willfully ignorant that's a problem. I'm sure the effectiveness depends on many factors, but those trees look fairly fresh, wet wood is a real son of a whore... But the tool you need for the project at hand and you won't have problems. Complaining about a battery operated chainsaw not being able to slice n dice a whole tree is like asking a kid from little league to hit a homer. Nothing negative towards OP. Maybe this is just a reminder to keep our expectations in check, in all aspects of life, including felling trees.


WarWinx

Yeah, I was a little dejected after the problems I was having today (more in my ability to use the chainsaw as intended than the saw’s performance honestly), but the responses I got here have really put that back in perspective.


jjdiablo

It just takes practice, and learning from mistakes.


Sir_Morch

Mistakes are one of the most important part of the learning process. if nobody ever had a mistake we'd still be back in the stone ages. I applaud you for reaching out and trying to be better instead bashing the tool or yourself. This all might seem fairly rudimentary to people that have had power tools in their hands their whole lives, but that doesn't make it the same for everyone. I've fucked up, and continue to fuck up everyday in the trades, and it's my job. We learn from mistakes, you're doing just fine brother


Hayderade721

You just need to sharpen the chain or buy another. I have like 5 chains for mine


WarWinx

That… seems excessive.


sezu

A few thoughts... Do the bar and chain match? If the gauge is too big for the bar it will drag and make the saw work harder. Is you chain tensioned correctly? Too tight and again, your saw has to work harder. Really wondering about this one. If this is a new bar and your pic is all you've cut with it so far that seems like a surprising amount of wear. Do you have bar oil in the saw and is it lubing correctly? If not, well you know where I'm going by now. As others have said, make sure your chain is sharp. My general rule of thumb is to touch it up every time I run out of gas. Lastly, how hard are you bearing down on the saw? The saw should be pulling itself down into the cut without you putting too much muscle behind it. Non saw related, if this is just firewood or you're just trying to get rid of it, you might see if there is a woodworking guild in your area. A wood turner might be very happy to get some of that. That is some purty wood. (phrasing?)


WarWinx

Bar and chain were a kit. Chain pulls out from the bar enough that I don’t think it’s overtightened. Add and check oil by running it in front of a surface and watching for discoloration before cutting. Letting the saw do most of the work; light pressure every once in awhile, but forcing it is how I melted my first battery so I learned that lesson the hard way. The wear is surprising to me as well, but it’s mostly from the log/branches pinching — still working on getting the knack on counter-cutting and whatnot. There was another length of the same tree, maybe even longer (30+ ft), behind it. Those cuts only ran from maybe 12 to 18 inches, progressively, in diameter, though.


Loudsound07

Jesus Christ man, that's a huge tree for that little saw. Like getting pissed because your Ford ranger struggles to tow your gooseneck trailer. Not the right tool for the job.


WarWinx

That has been, consistently, the response here: So I realized that I was more frustrated with my lack of skill using the saw than the saw itself.


Loudsound07

Fair enough, lol. I'm actually thoroughly impressed that the saw did that at all.


AggressorBLUE

This would push the limits of my 18” eGo, and thats a 60v platform. That you noted in another response that your batts are over-heating also illustrates why big red might be being a bit optimistic with a 16” bar on a 20v platform. They really need a new platform if they’re going to keep pushing into OPE. Something to split the difference between 20v and MX Fuel.


WarWinx

*18v


pew_medic338

Despite them still calling it M18, the new OPE stuff, like the blower and mower, are 36 volt systems. I'm okay with them keeping in the M18 battery family, so they as they keep pumping out 36v tools, so I don't have to buy into a new battery platform.


rammsteinmatt

How sharp is your chain? I was able to fully section up a 14” diameter tree, 20 feet long, on 2 5.0s. The chainsaw eats 5.0s, but a sharp chain and technique seems to be more critical for a battery saw. Obviously your tree is a lot bigger than 14”, but I’m surprised it’s taking you about 16 Ah per cut. That’s a lot.


WarWinx

Yeah, this is pretty dense, sturdy wood; I think the diameter I started at was around 20” - and I did six cuts that day - now I’m at maybe 24-25.” So it’s been progressively *fewer* cuts, but also progressively *larger*.


Tool_Scientist

Hang on, aren't you the dude that's been melting his batteries using this chainsaw? Why did you try to take on a big arse tree with it?


WarWinx

That be me, aye. I melted my first battery trying to fell this very tree. My only excuse is… ignorance. Brute force and ignorance.


Tool_Scientist

I mean it'll work, just gotta take your time.


RKELEC

It's for cutting up branches and small logs for campfires, not for felling and bucking 80' Douglas firs


WarWinx

Joke’s on you: this was only a 70’ Red Alder!


Numerous_Program1060

How many times and what type of chain do you have on it?


WarWinx

I threw an Oregon replacement bar/chain on it - it’s the same as stock, except it’s .07” wider. I think this is non-consecutive day three or four just working on bucking.


Numerous_Program1060

I have a lot of Milwaukee tools but I only run gas chainsaws and I'm kind of a Husqvarna whore. I sharpen my chains every tank of fuel and flip the bar over. If you aren't cutting curls your chain isn't sharp. Bucking is also rough because if you just nick the dirt you're going to need to sharpen the chain.


WarWinx

Curls even with an anti-bucking/jumping chain? I think the only time I’ve seen curls is when I pushed way too hard. But I am getting pretty clean chips.


hyperlite227

Nice job! Incredible lol


Classic-Stranger-470

There’s no replacement for displacement!


New_Restaurant_6093

I have a 38cc with a 16” bar and it does not like to buck rounds of hardwood anything more then 8”.


BiscottiMany7014

Use stihl


Tylahhhh

Go to a pawnshop and get a gasser for stuff this size. Stihl Husqvarna or jonsered. Like 55cc or bigger


pnwloveyoutalltrees

I had the same issue. Sharpen extremely wellchange the chain. It’s night and day difference.


borosillykid

I bet that took all summer with that tool lol!


wonderfullyforgottte

Work at the zoo. Battery saws are not about stamina it is about utility. Our battery saws get a lot of use but mostly odd jobs.


NoideaLessinterest

Seeing this post has actually convinced me to buy one of those!


WarWinx

Heh, glad I could help!


Hayderade721

It rocks, OP just needs to sharpen chain or buy a new one


jjdiablo

Just by looking at the photos, thats not a tree I would use a 16” M18 saw on. I have one, as well as a 2 Stihls , and the gas powered Stihl with an 18” bar with a well maintained chain is what I would use. Its just too much tree for that M18 especially the setup you are running.


_TheNecromancer13

OP if you live in the PNW like I suspect, shoot me a message, I'd be happy to give you some chainsaw tips, because don't take this the wrong way, but based on your series of posts about this project you are going to end up killing yourself. A chainsaw is one of the most dangerous tools even when used by people with proper training.


LoopWasAParakeet

A for effort. F for execution. You’re going to get yourself killed, or maimed. I’m coming off as an ass, but dude, using the wrong saw for a job like this is as bad as not using proper PPE when using a proper saw, actually worse. It’s kind of like using a dull kitchen knife when chopping veggies: you’re way more likely to injure yourself than if you used a sharpened knife. You thought the alternative to this was using a corded saw? Are you being serious? Which is totally fine if you are, you don’t know what you don’t know. Just please stop before the next post is you in the hospital without one or your own limbs attached. Someone above offered some assistance in saw use, take them up on it!


[deleted]

I am pretty impressed that saw can manage to cut a 20" tree


Oujene

Being a Canadian I’m almost ashamed to say majority of my chainsaw experience is from running chainsaws is electric or pneumatic chainsaws underground. Building staging or pastefill platforms. I will say though I would have loved to have a Milwaukee chainsaw for the work we were doing. Seems like more and more our crews are using cordless Milwaukee tools. I credit it to having a Milwaukee dealership close buy the mine site. I think these small saws are made more for clearing trail or small firewood and not actually tackling large rounds.


electrotech71

I have the same saw. Most of what I cut is pine trees which is a softer wood, but I have cut several this size. It’s a little to much for this size saw. I use a carbide blade (stays sharp) and a tree this size takes me 3ea 6ah batteries to limb it and cut into 18”-24” logs.


Horsetoothbrush

I love the cordless revolution, but battery powered chainsaws? That’s just hilarious.


whoaismebro13

🎵I'm a happy idiot🎵


Str8_Outta_Brompton

At least you hydrated. Good luck


JibJabJake

I know it's not mean for trees this size but I cut some poplars just the other day that size with mine. Granted I cut mine into 8 ft sections after felling.


BlackFalcon1

my biggest problem with the m18 say is I constantly overheat the batteries cutting trees like this. last year when I was cutting in nov-dec and outside temps were hovering around freezing I got WAY more cuts out of a single batt. thermal management REALLY needs to be addressed.


bigpipes84

Sad to see it chunked for firewood instead of getting milled for lumber. Looks like it would have made for some nice boards. You would have been able to buy 3x that amount of firewood if you hired someone with a mobile sawmill to slab, sticker and strap it to dry and sell. Lumber isn't cheap these days.


WarWinx

Well, where were you to tell me that three months ago?


bigpipes84

I don't even know you or where you're from, but I'd have definitely helped you find a sawmill in your area. Just glue the chunks back together. No one will know...


WarWinx

Okay… I’ve got Elmer’s Glue-All and Gorilla Wood Glue… give me a few minutes.


DraconianDrip

Hi there OP, Just writing to add that it’s advisable to flip your bar every 4-5 cuts as well for optimum performance.


Whatyouwant1970

Dolmar 7910 28” bar tear it up quick!


XWing69

Try the ego 56v on a tree that large.


mineral-dik

Obviously not made for this but you should have manually sharpened your chain and flipped your bar multiple times for a job like this.


WarWinx

A number of people have said that, but no one has told me what milestones I should be looking for as to *when* to do that. I’m getting clean chips, not dust, from the cuts. That’s the only gauge I have, and apparently it’s wrong.


mineral-dik

Honestly I can't tell you with an electric saw. I know my chain is dull when I have to apply excessive pressure on the saw when cutting. I sharpen after going through about every other tank of gas with a hand file. Edit: A hand file designed for a chainsaw


WarWinx

Yeah, see? I’m not having to apply pressure — I’m letting the saw do the work, even after all these rounds. It keeps spitting out clean chips, I keep slapping in fresh batteries. Biggest trouble I’m having is getting cuts that match up on both sides. Check out that round closest to the camera: bottom middle. That ledge? When I cut from one side, I struggle to keep it from canting. Doesn’t matter how intent I am on keeping from angling. When I cut from the other side, I can keep it straight. …hmmm - when the motor is on the down-slope side, it cants too far, but when the motor is in the uphill side, it naturally cuts into the wood perpendicular to the tree.


Squizgarr

This post really gave me a good chuckle. Did you buy the M18 saw just for this type of work? Bless your heart.


WarWinx

Yep. Bought it specifically because I didn’t want to run 600’ of extension cords to this tree.


Squizgarr

You didn't think about a gas saw? 🤔


WarWinx

I will just get more hate for saying this, but I didn’t want a gas saw. I wanted to avoid: the loud engine, the fumes, the smell, the small engine maintenance, the burns from touching the wrong hot part, the gas prices, the fuel mixing…


Squizgarr

Yea don't we all.


MrHaphazard1

How old are all those 32 ah?


fisheeyseyes

The age genuinely shouldn’t matter its just too much work for that little electric motor. 32ah is the kind of power that should last you 3 months on the daily with an impact driver, and this dude is using that every day.


MrHaphazard1

It does if you have old batteries it they will die super fast. The cells don't last forever. Also if the chain is sharp and you're not using too much force it should be able to cut it no problem it may just take longer because there is so much material.


WarWinx

The batteries are all less than six months old. The main problem - I’m coming to realize - is that I’m also new hand at cutting wood, and struggling to keep my cuts straight and clean. So I’m wasting a lot of power on recuts and binding.


Mildy-Concerned

This is gold.


argybargy2019

That tree is way too big for a battery saw. It’s big for a plug in electric chain saw. It’s big for a 16” gas saw. I think you need to adjust expectations- your saw is designed for use with branches up to 4” or so. You are probably destroying your batteries with this project.


arrek_hadaar

Yesterday i cut down a 30 cm thic beech with no proplem. New chain and 11ah batterie rocked that Job. So it was 12 Cuts and i only lost one bar. The New sharp chain was the most Important and the 11 amps


WarWinx

So… 30cm is just under 12 inches. I’m working on an over 60cm diameter log (4x the surface area for each cut). Between the smaller log being easier to cut, and assuming you have more experience (and skill) at making proper cuts… I could see that being a reasonable disparity in our power usage. I haven’t lost any bars though, so maybe that’s something I can hold my head up about?


arrek_hadaar

Yes! 60 cm is real heavy for a 40 cm blade. I had to cut down a fir witch was ablut 50 to 60 cm. And it was tough. I think you expect to much. Like other rwditors say, eaven a 40cm Husquarna or Stiel with gas would strougle. But try a new chain. Maye that will help a lot. Hope my english was good enough. Greetings from Germany


ugly_brick

Lmao bro that thing is for like little saplings and messing around in the woods in your off-road truck. Go get a fucking 034 or something 😂


OakenArmor

How is your experience with the Mil chainsaw so far? I keep hearing they piss bar oil everywhere.


WarWinx

I have not had that experience so far. I had the little pruner saw leak a little overnight when I first got it (and probably overfilled it)but have since just stored it at a different angle, and haven’t had it happen again.


FailedFornication

Rofl why man


AimMoreBetter

While it may have been a bit much for that saw to take on this is just another reason why Milwaukee should have gone with the MX line for outdoor power equipment.


fisheeyseyes

Um i get battery powered tools are great for alot of stuff but with big projects, especially with regard to any kind of saw that uses quite a bit of power. It’s almost always better to go with gas. NEVER BUY A BATTERY POWERED CHAINSAW. If you really would rather use an electric one, get one that can be plugged in, and if you don’t have an outlet within a hundred feet, bring a damn generator.


fisheeyseyes

Return the saw and the batteries and you should have enough for a decent 20” gas saw. Don’t go and get a crap one from Ryobi though.