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A good night’s sleep may mitigate infant obesity risks. Researchers found just one additional hour of sleep correlated with a 26 percent decrease in infants' risk of being overweight. In addition, infants that woke up less throughout the night faced a lower risk of excess weight gain.

A good night’s sleep may mitigate infant obesity risks. Researchers found just one additional hour of sleep correlated with a 26 percent decrease in infants' risk of being overweight. In addition, infants that woke up less throughout the night faced a lower risk of excess weight gain.

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Wagamaga

Scientists have long suggested that getting enough sleep at night is vital to staying healthy. Few studies, however, highlight the necessity of sufficient sleep during the first months of life. New research from investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and collaborators suggests that newborns who sleep longer and wake up less throughout the night are less likely to be overweight in infancy. Their results are published in Sleep. "While an association between insufficient sleep and weight gain is well-established in adults and older children, this link has not been previously recognized in infants," said study co-author Susan Redline, MD, MPH, senior physician in the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders at the Brigham. "In this study, we found that not only shorter nighttime sleep, but more sleep awakenings, were associated with a higher likelihood of infants becoming overweight in the first six months of life." To conduct this research, Redline and colleagues observed 298 newborns born at Massachusetts General Hospital between 2016 and 2018. They then monitored their sleep patterns using ankle actigraphy watches — devices that measure patterns of activity and rest over multiple days. Researchers extracted three nights' worth of data at the one- and six-month marks while parents kept sleep diaries, recording their children's sleep and wake episodes. To collect growth measurements, scientists measured infant height and weight and determined their body mass index. Infants were classified as overweight if they fell into or above the 95th percentile on the World Health Organization's growth charts. https://academic.oup.com/sleep/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsab243/6401902?redirectedFrom=fulltext


FidelityDeficit

Perhaps the babies that wake up more often have a bottle shoved into their mouth more frequently?


dr_the_goat

Great. So now I've got to worry about that, as well as being tired all the time.


Confident_Bridge9811

I feel your tiredness.